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drama-hath-worms:

notfuckingcishet:

Emma Sulkowicz. 

(x)

This has got big




thisamyshouldbeinthetardis:

youareabadger:

I just really love it when actors wear t-shirts about their projects or friends for fun

like

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i

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just

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look at

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how amazingimage

it is

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I love how half of these are Rupert Grint he’s so cute




gifbinge:

Kid gets a banana as a prank gift from his parents on his birthday. Look at his excitement. This kid is my hero.

gifbinge:

Kid gets a banana as a prank gift from his parents on his birthday. Look at his excitement. This kid is my hero.




brightwalldarkroom:

“School of Rock is beautiful in many ways because it plays out like a fantasy film. Of course it’s not realistic. Of course that’s not how educators should behave. It’s not real, but you want it to be real. I watched School of Rock in my early teens and wanted to be part of it. I wanted music to be as magical for me as it was to the kids in the film. I wanted it to save my life, but instead it became my life. I became a percussion score on a piece of paper.
That’s the thing about rock ‘n roll, Dewey explains. You don’t win at it. You can do a thing called Battle of the Bands and you can win a big check, but you’re never really winning at music. It’s not a competition. It’s about how it makes you feel. For the kids in School of Rock, music is liberating. It opens up a snooty, private school education into something bigger and better that allows the students to express themselves. You learn how to create and build something that is both yours and not yours. Music is about sharing. It’s about giving something away to someone else.”
—Fran Hoepfner on School of Rock
(Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #16, September 2014)

brightwalldarkroom:

School of Rock is beautiful in many ways because it plays out like a fantasy film. Of course it’s not realistic. Of course that’s not how educators should behave. It’s not real, but you want it to be real. I watched School of Rock in my early teens and wanted to be part of it. I wanted music to be as magical for me as it was to the kids in the film. I wanted it to save my life, but instead it became my life. I became a percussion score on a piece of paper.

That’s the thing about rock ‘n roll, Dewey explains. You don’t win at it. You can do a thing called Battle of the Bands and you can win a big check, but you’re never really winning at music. It’s not a competition. It’s about how it makes you feel. For the kids in School of Rock, music is liberating. It opens up a snooty, private school education into something bigger and better that allows the students to express themselves. You learn how to create and build something that is both yours and not yours. Music is about sharing. It’s about giving something away to someone else.”

—Fran Hoepfner on School of Rock

(Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #16, September 2014)







eliaes:

Drake and Nicki shopping in a corner store on the set of Usher’s “She Came to Give It to You” video.




talkdowntowhitepeople:

weedreamsandrank:

skeetbucket:

nedahoyin:

Teaching Yebin a lesson (x)

THIS BABYYY..

Omg can’t wait to have a kid

Her cheeks!!!!!

this is really cute but I also want to protect her with a sword and shield




rare among their k i n d.




mypatronusisrorypond:

redscudery:

saunteringvaguelydownwards:

decemberpaladin:

sizvideos:

Video

I love how she almost drops it until she smells it and that flashbulb memory hits.

“Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real … Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”

Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit

Notice she says “who” it was and not “what” it was.

Oh I just gotta snuggle my baby bear!




maptitude1:

This map shows the neighborhoods of Washington, D.C.

maptitude1:

This map shows the neighborhoods of Washington, D.C.




kimkanyekimye:

5 YEARS ago today, September 13, 2009

kimkanyekimye:

5 YEARS ago today, September 13, 2009








Played 595,217 Times



"All of this is typical girl-fear. Once you realize that The Exorcist is, essentially, the story of a 12-year-old who starts cussing, masturbating, and disobeying her mother—in other words, going through puberty—it becomes apparent to the feminist-minded viewer why two adult men are called in to slap her around for much of the third act. People are convinced that something spooky is going on with girls; that, once they reach a certain age, they lose their adorable innocence and start tapping into something powerful and forbidden. Little girls are sugar and spice, but women are just plain scary. And the moment a girl becomes a woman is the moment you fear her most. Which explains why the culture keeps telling this story."
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Rookie, The Season of the Witch

For readings on the correlation in horror between puberty and the monstrous, see:

(via bluntlyblue)